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be wise to look beyond the fiscal cliff because all the fears it's tomorrow doing the economy are misplaced. >> most economists have said if we go into 2013 without a deal we'll go into recession. >> we might have into 2013 for three days or knife days or a week before there's a deal. that's about it. the pressure from financial markets will be too great so the scenario that you just referred to to, we go over the cliff, had and the economy sinks. i want to emphasize that cannot happen. >> let me move on to another topic. timothy geithner has said he's not returning for another four years. your name has been mentioned as a replacement. >> of course they are not going to make any changes during that team during the pennedsy of all of this. the president has lots of good choices for whatever comes next. i very much doubt that i'll be part of that but they are in good shape and they don't have anything to do about this. do youly jack lew would be a good treasury secretary. fiscal issues will continue to be and the for foernt even after after agreement on the cliff and the preside
the fiscal cliff, that the economy will see a contraction of a couple of percentage points. where are you on earnings for 2013, what are your expectations? >> maria, look at the s&p numbers, looking for a slow single digit percentage gains. for this period of the fourth quarter looking for gains in telecommunications and financials. i think the critical part, investors ought to be very keen just to weigh in the risk, you know, and the fact they had a very rewarding year in 2012, we were up about 12% on the s&p 500. earnings will be very much held captive by the fact that the uncertainty not only about the fiscal cliff but debt ceiling. >> very quickly, john, we're lose altitude in this market rapidly. what do you make of this, and what are you expecting to close here? >> just shows you how fragile our markets r.one comment out of washington can take profits off the table intraday. we'll hold on to our gains here. >> thanks, everybody. we appreciate it. where exactly do we stand in these fiscal cliff negotiations in the latest now from our john harwood, on your stomping ground. good to see
automatic tax increases and spending cuts will send the economy over the fiscal cliff, and around the capitol there's largely the sound of silence as the white house and congress try to work out a deal behind closed doors. the president has no public events on his schedule. and all through the house, not a creature was stirring except, that is, for john boehner, who emerged to gavel the house into session this afternoon after a week's recess with his trademark holiday cheer. >> washington has a spending problem. now, the president doesn't agree with our approach. he's got an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering when is the president going to get serious? >> i'm sorry, i meant his trademark ba ham bug which he's been doling out by the sleigh load. >> there's a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. we have a debt problem that is out of control. we've got to cut spending. washington has got a spending problem. just more of the same. >> more of the same indeed. a
think. first, forget the fiscal cliff, because the economy is coming back. americans are feeling more optimistic about 2013 and if we play our cards right, we're going to see a new economic renaissance. td ameritrade recently surveyed folks on their outlook for the new year. 43% say they're downright optimistic about the economy and believe we're headed for a rebound. 45% are feeling good about their own finances, but we already know that things are starting to get better. look, we're adding jobs every month, consumer debt continues to shrink. stock markets are up. longer term, though. america will reap the rewards of its domestic energy boom and more oil and gas gets extracted. the drop in the price of natural gas is already helping utilities and factories compete. that's creating more american jobs. and there is more. housing will be the golden lining to the economic cloud that is hanging over this country. mortgage rates are at historic low and should stay that way for the next two years but home prices have seen their bottom and are heading back up. when they do, confidence goes u
the board spending cuts. here with the very latest on the fiscal cliff showdown and america's fragile economy is the former new york city mayor rudy giuliani. how are you? >> how are you, sean? good to see you. >> sean: i just like to learn from people that have done successful things, you took how many people off of welfare when you were mayor? >> 600,000. >> what was the deficit when you became mayor? >> $2.3 billion. >> sean: and the debt? >> staggering. >> 600,000 off welfare, and -- >> we did it by my taking a report that asked me to raise taxes and throw in the garbage. the report said you have to raise taxes across the board. said nothing about reducing spending. i said to myself -- i wasn't an economic expert then. i became one after being mayor of new york. i said this doesn't make sense. if i raise taxes now, i have to do it again in two years, then four years, because i'm losing the tax base. people will leave. i'll try something different. i'll try to lower taxes, lower spending. i can't lower taxes too much at the beginning, but just a little bit, lower spending. i lowere
, the economy and the looming fiscal cliff. jpmorgan chairman ceo jamie dimon. carlyle group cofounder david rubenstein and a lot more. and it all starts tomorrow at 6:00 a.m. eastern on "squawk box." [ male announcer ] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to squawk. happy monday. today in the "wall street journal" suggesting netflix could end up doomed with its success with children. netflix just for kids get more popular. companies like viacom get accurate. companies provide netflix with most of its content in a kids' focused section. the journal says at some point the suppliers will probably want to charge netflix more
to be 33%. the winner, the fiscal cliff, 35%. what are people saying about the fiscal cliff? we have people write in, and i believe that's what we'll look at next. we'll look at the probability of a u.s. recession. that has come up. in part because of the fiscal cliff concerns. it was 19% back in march. a high of 36%. so we're halfway between the low and the high pretty much. this is a 13-month high for the probability of recession. now we want to show you what people are saying about the fiscal cliff, allowing the economy to go over the cliff would be extremely reckless, says donnelly. they're going out to try to help the unemployment rate. wall street doesn't believe it's going to happen. they do believe it will help lower mortgage rates and the unemployment rate and not a lot of help expected for the stock market. melissa? >> steve, thanks for that. that's interesting stuff there. >> nothing like getting your blood pressure up. liesman testing you live on tv. >> what do you think? wrong, wrong. brought back bad memories, huh, carl? 2013 housing market outlook this morning, according to t
slow-walks this process the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. there is major business lobbyist out there telling us right now the discussions are focusing on process. how do to it. not necessarily substance. so there are no details on what these offers exactly state. they're not even really getting out on capitol hill right now. so we're still watching it to maintain. again you've got the exchange of partial offers at least coming out of the white house and from house republicans but they still remain fairly far apart. melissa: rich, you have been right in the heart of this story from the beginning. to you, does this feel like progress? what's your opinion? >> anything at this point feels like progress but they are still stuck on the major problems that have dogged them for the last couple of years basically, not just the last couple of weeks. problems with spending cuts. problems with entitlements for democrats. problems with tax revenue for republicans on the other side. there's no movement it seems towards that right now. but again, details are very, very thin on th
the process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. >> two g.o.p. lawmakers here to share their reactions next. can china take over america? is it already happening under our noses? why one author says absolutely, yes. also, ford motor company under fire for misleading customers. it's enough to make your blood boil. we'll weigh in on the hybrids' possible false advertising. we're on the case next on "the willis report." tracy: speaker boehner warning the white house to be serious to call cliff, and the majority leader throwing in the towel saying it's difficult to reach a deal by christmas. crazy. with more, senator barrasso from wyoming. do you have any idea what's in the counteroffer? >> i don't have the final details on that, tracy. we have to avert the fiscal cliff. my concern is it drives us into recession, knocks up employment up, and i agree with you, we have to ensure more people have more of their own money in the pockets to decide what to save, spend, what to invest, and anything that hurts our fragile economy, i think is bad for all americans, especially those l
their fiscal cliff end game. give in on taxes and take the economy hostage again. congressman chris van hollen responds tonight. >>> somehow raising the medicare eligibility age is back in the fiscal cliff discussion. david cay johnston says it would be -- to do it, and he is here tonight. >> what we shouldn't be doing is try to take away your rights to bargain for better working conditions. >> in michigan, the president stands up for workers like he has never done before. >> these so-called right the work laws, they don't have to do with economics. they have everything to do with politics. >> tonight the president's big speech, and why the fight in michigan is an assault on workers everywhere. >>> plus, major news on a white house push for immigration reform. in 40 years after man's last trip to the moon, a return voyage may be a reality. astronomer derrick ditz will tell you why the golden spike is a big deal. good to have you with us, folks. thanks for watching. the new republican strategy is to take the american economy hostage when they don't get what they want. they realize their back is
have another developing story with the ongoing negotiations of the fiscal cliff. despite spine signs of a deal in sight, house speaker boehner accused the president of holding back when it comes to spending cuts. >> the longer white house slow walk this is process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. we know that the president wants more stimulus spending and increase in the debt limit without any cuts or reforms. that's not fixing our problem. frankly, it's making it worse. >> let me bring in our "news nation" political panel this hour. chris cafinus, michael smerkonish and louies romanis. what are we to make of speaker boehner coming out today, not sure of the overall message other than he wanted to have, i guess, a sound bite to play today as we continue to talk and the president is off at least negotiating behind the scenes on the fiscal cliff. >> i think you called it, tamron. look, the rhetoric is scaled back dramatically in the last few days. they're talking and seriously evidenced by the fact we're not learning that much. they're keeping it pretty close to the ve
't be happy about it. >> reporter: as lawmakers rush to rescue the economy from the fiscal cliff emergency, they have focused -- as have we thus far -- on itemized deductions. but when it comes to tax breaks or preferences, says robert... >> not just deductions. it includes things like exclusion from income, the biggest one of which is the we don't tax you on the premiums your employer pays for the health insurance we get. much bigger than anything on the deduction side. it's not the only exclusion we have. the exclusion of all the contributions to the retirement plans, your 401(k), your irks r.a., also very, very large. >> reporter: we're not going to start counting as income the money that our employer puts in for our medical insurance, are we? or for that matter, we're not going to get rid of the exclusion for putting money into a 401(k) to deaver taxation but encourage us to save more. >> it's pretty unlikely we'll count all of that income. we're already scheduled to count some of the premiums paid your employers. in 2018 the obama care will start taxing the very highest premiums, the
in the fiscal cliff. after that, a panel on innovation and the economy. later a conversation about have the fiscal deadline could affect the defense budget. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal," we continue our look at the so- called fiscal clef and what happens if the budget cuts take place in january. jim doyle the effect on businesses. after that, charles clark looks at domestic program cuts. in more about the issue with the brookings institution. bless your e-mail, phone calls, and tweets. that is live tuesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> next, president obama talking about the economy and the need to reach an agreement with congress on the january fiscal deadline. he spoke at a diesel plant outside of detroit. his remarks are about 25 minutes. >> hello, redford! [applause] it is good to be back in michigan. [applause] how is everybody doing today? [applause] now, let me just start off by saying we have something in common -- both our teams lost yesterday. [laughter] i mean, i would like to come here and talk a little smack about the bears, but we didn't quite get it
as president obama drives our economy toward the fiscal cliff, i'd like to share with you some remarks he made during his fiscal responsibility summit held on february 23, 2009, at the white house. the president said, and i quote, we cannot and will not sustain deficits like these without end. contrary to the prevailing wisdom in washington, these past few years, we cannot simply spend as we please and to further consequences to the nks budget. the next administration or the next generation. we are paying the price for this budget right now. he continued, in 2008 alone we paid $250 billion in interest on our debt. one in every 10 taxpayer dollars. that is more than three times what we spent on education that year, more than seven times what we spent on v.a. health care. if we can fraught this crisis without confronting the deficit that caused it, we end up sifpking into another crisis down the road as our interest payments rise and obligations come due. our children and grandchildren are unable to pursue their dreams because they are saddled with our debts. that's why today i'm pledging to cut
. we'll be taking that u with the a-team here tonight. stay with us. >>> the fiscal cliff fiasco. the obama plan, the boehner plan, will either alter america's rising rate of spending or lessen the size our bloatedgornment? the answer in tonight's chalk talk. >>is the housing market really recovering? $17 trillion is riding on the answer. the president and ceo o citi mortgage joins us next. [beep] [indistinct chatter] [kids talking at once] [speaking foreign language] [heart beaeating] [heartbeat continues] [faint singing] [heartbeat, music playi loude ♪ i'm feeling better since you knome ♪ ♪ i was a lonely soul, but that's the old me... ♪ announcer: thisong was created with heartbeats of children ineed. find out how it can help frontline e health workers bring hope to millions of children at everybeatmatters.org. lou: new rorts show foreign investment is heingthe housg market slowly recover. citimortgage president and ceo sanjiv das joins us here in just moments to discuss thatnd much more when it comesto housing. in the money lineonight, investors waiting cautiously to
-team here tonight. stay with us. >>> the fiscal cliff fiasco. the obama plan, the boehner plan, will either alter america's rising rate of spending or lessen the size of our bloated government? the answer in tonight's chalk talk. >>> is the housing market really recovering? $17 trillion is riding on the answer. the president and ceo of citi mortgage joins us next. twins. i dn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligation b obligatio. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is eep. introducing the ishares core, budinglos for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 ilarge professisional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectis, risks, charges and expenses. ad and consider itarefully bere investing. ri includes possible ss of principal. lou: new reports show foreign investment is helping the housing market slowly recover. citimortgage president and ceo sanjiv das joins us here in just moments to discuss that and much more when it comes to housing. in the mo
, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. >> nobody should trust democrats to put a dime until real deficit reductions. >> reporter: to better understand the gop positioning, remember what any reduction deficit looks like drawn from two different pots of money. first, tax revenue. second, spending cuts likely to center on changes to entitlements like medicare. on revenues, republicans already conceded to tax increases for the wealthy. the big sticking point is what kind and how much. since that is angering many on the right who oppose any tax increases, republicans want democrats to take the heat for entitlement cuts by proposing them first so republicans don't face the wrath of seniors, too. remember this 2011 ad depicting paul ryan throwing granny off the cliff? the white house says it's republicans who haven't offered specifics and the president has. >> very specific spending cuts, including savings in entitlement programs. again, i -- it's not a mystery. we've seen this before. this is the document. >> reporter: that document is last year's white house recommendations to the sup
? the longer the white house slow walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. here's what we do know. we know that the president wants more stimulus spending and an increase in the debt limit without any cuts or reforms. that's not physicianing our problem. frankly, it's making it worse. on top of that, the president wants to raise tax rates on many small business owners. now, even if we did exactly what the president wants, we would see red ink for as far as the eye can see. that's not fixing our problem either. it's making it worse, and it's hurting our economy. i think the members know i'm an optimist. i'm hopeful we can reach an agreement. this is a serious issue and there's a lot at stake. the american people sent us here to work together towards the best possible solution, and that means cutting spending. now, if the president doesn't agree with our approach, he has an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering when is the president going to
and the longer the white house slow walk this is process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering, when is the president going to get serious? >> if there's one fact that should not be in dispute it ought to be this. the president unlike any other party to these negotiations has put forward detailed spending cuts as well as detailed revenue proposals. it is a simple fact. >> i was hoping for actual video of the grinch. to help sort things out today, we have joan walsh, editor at large of salon and did many, many things in her career and besides being steve's own boss. we are obligated to say that every single time she is on. congratulations for hiring steve. i think we have covered that. good job, joan. >> my finest moment, clearly. >> absolutely. look, there's an idea being batted around about raising the medicare age from 65 to 67. you write a lot about in it your piece today on salon.com. a lot of people exasperated at this idea. why are you against it? >> it's a terrible idea because it saves some money but i
house slow-walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. now, if the president doesn't agree with our approach, he's got an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering when is the president going to get serious? >> on that question of whether or not we have put forward specific spending cuts, the answer is is we have. not only that, we signed law a trillion dollars in specific spending cuts. so if you combine what is signed into law with what we proposed versus the total absence of any specificity from the republicans for a single dollar in revenue, i think in the battle of specificity, the outcome has already been decided. >> woodruff: and a short time ago an administration official told us the president and the speaker spoke by phone this evening. now to our series of conversations on this subject and what should be done. we've listened to a range of opinions in recent days, including erskine bowles of the simpson-bowles commission; prize-win
that probably occurred with the fiscal cliff. the spring selling season begins in late january. we have been the bright spot in the economy. our industry are creating jobs, we're coming back in the early stages of a recovery so the fiscal cliff january 1 would have a huge impact on the country, and impact on our business, and we have our fingers crossed and are very hopeful washington can get something done and we'll have to see. but if they don't, there is no question there will be a little bit of time until things settle down when the buyers will hit the sidelines. liz: will it derail the tentative recovery here? >> right now we are three weeks away from this fiscal cliff date and we're still selling houses. i don't think it derails it, but there could be a pause until things get worked out. liz: part of it is being discussed, and that is the possible elimination or at least the cutting of the mortgage interest rate deduction here. on one hand you have that would really hurt this industry and we need this sector to come back on the other, doesn't everybody have to have a stake in this? how
with investors and traders trying to avoid that fiscal cliff, although potentially that could happen next year? > > we have seen two big trades really, angie. first, last week gold came off about $50 an ounce. it was rumored that hedge funds specifically were exiting long positions ahead of year-end to meet both investor redemptions as well as a number of other tax-related issues. secondly, the corporate bond market has been very busy over the last couple of weeks. corporates are issuing debt at record low yields, turning around and using that capital to pay out special dividends to shareholders. costco and home depot have been two specific names that have used that capital structure, arbitrage, in order to reward shareholders ahead of year-end. we may see a bit more of it in the next few weeks. > good to have you on the show. that is john brady of rj o'brien. thanks. > > thank you. lawmakers in michigan are on the verge of handing organized labor a defeat in a state where just 20 years ago more than one in four workers were union members. but that membership has since declined. our cover stor
slow walks this process the closer our economy gets fought fiscal cliff. -- gets to the fiscal cliff. here's what we know. we know that the president wants more stimulus spending and an increase in the debt limit without any cuts or reforms. that's not fixing our problem. frankly, it's making it worse. on top of that, the president wants to raise taxes on many small business owners. now, even if we did exactly what the president wants, we would see red ink as far as the eye can see. that's not fixing our problem either. it's making it worse and it's hurting our economy. i think the members know i'm an optimist. i'm hopeful we can reach an agreement. this is a serious issue and there's a lot at stake. the american people sent us here to work together toward the best possible solution and that means cutting spending. if the president doesn't agree with our approach, he's got an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering whe minority leader, ms. pelosi, for five minute
on with the fiscal cliff negotiations and we heard from john boehner that he wants obamacare on the table. is this an opportunity for the president to acknowledge the fact that this bill is so unpopular, continues to be so unpopular and perhaps sit down and negotiate some positive changes to the health care law that everybody could be on board with? should this president take that opportunity right now? >> right now, no because it is adding too much complexity to a negotiation that is trying to get done between now and christmas. next year i think everything should be on the table, right? i think as we look to fashion the budget. rick: including obamacare? >> i think that if the republicans and president has said this repeatedly, if they can bring ideas to the table that will improve obamacare he will be open to it. so i think you will see everything on the table next year. but i think i want to be clear he is not backing away from the health care reform that he pushed so hard for because the old system wasn't working. we need a better health care system. remember, this year the past year
deductionieces per the fiscal cliff could throw a short-term wrinkle in there. domestic energy a huge boom in the economy right now. there are some bright spots. the probm iso add them all up and it still does not come anywhere near what the consumer represents in the economy. i don't think it will be a drag on the economy for the ongoing leveraging still necessary, income growthhfairly we relatively slow job covery, that these of the economy is still likely to be slow growth mode. tracy: a fiscal clf is drag on confence whether y understand the implications of it or n, just hearinit is enough to make you want to hide under your pillow, right? what is your thought on this? consumers have not so much been whistling past the graveyard on the issue, only more recently, to the realization of what this could possib mean for them and t also some positive to foc on which his housing and gasoli prices. businesses have been deang with the uncertain ftor for many months now. the only potential good news is we might have front end loaded the business side with capital spending. that could mean a quil
to the economy. we're going to have a fight on the fiscal cliff. another on the debt ceiling. it's destroying confident in the markets and what bothers me, larry, you know the subprime crisis hit like that. there was no warning. we could have another one like that. >> somebody has to control spending. i think the debt ceiling over a period of time is one way to do it. i'm sorry to you both. i have to get out of here. >> only roughly 800 billion apart. they can come together and solve it. >> i think the main tax -- >> for the good of the country. i'm probably not going to like the deal but that's probably what will happen. >> thank you so much. quick programming note. i will come to you life from our nation's capital tomorrow night as part of cnbc's special all day coverage. rise above, mission critical. now how do you like this scenario? the u.s. government using our tax money to build up an electric battery firm but after it fails the company sells out to a chinese outfit who takes advantage of our own taxpayer dollars. now producing for japan. there is something wrong with this picture. we'
and it is more of a slope. >> no, i think would be a mistake to go over the fiscal cliff because it could set in motion lots of things that could be a drag on the economy. that being said, i think if it's clear that the parties were working toward a negotiation, that you could spill into january without doing any irreversible damage. >> one of the ideas that seems to now be on the table is this idea of moving to a more accurate measure of inflation and using that to adjust social security benefits and tax brackets. is that something you could support in. >> well, i have two concerns with that. one is the general issue about dealing with social security in the context of these deficit reduction talks. because social security is fully solvent until the year 2033. after that point it would pay 75 cents on the dollar. if you do nothing. so we should work to deal with the long-term full solvency issue of social security. and the sooner we do that, the better. but it should be dealt with on its own terms. >> second, the chain cpi has a very negative impact on seniors, especially as they get older a
. we are a low-flying economy that's susceptible to downdrafts, and the fiscal cliff could provide that, but evaluations point to under evaluation at 15% and 20%. liz: charles, you got the bear claws out. i know you are cautious on a regular basis. we've known each other a long time, but, look, it's obvious that the headline risk is high closer and closer to the cliff, but let's say we get a deal or don't. you say we'll see weak equities in 2013, why? don't you have faith we're starting to see recoveries in the housing markets, certain metrics better. >> well, take home pay -- after tax income is up $300 billion this year over last year. 6.6 trillion in aggregate. how much taxes go up? a hundred bill, 500 billion? how can you have economic growth if the tax increases take away almost all the gain this year? now, also, know that the 300 billion gain cost the economy over a trillion dollars in subsidies. we have deficits and fed printing money of over a trillion dollars, all of that generated a 300 billion gain. ineffective and inefficient, but looks better than no gain, i guess. what i s
walks the process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. >> what i would do to respond to what the speaker has said, though, is to set the record straight. the fact is that the president has and democrats agree with him, agreed to over $1.5 trillion, $1.6 trillion in cuts and the budget control act and other acts of congress in this -- in this particular congress. $1.6 trillion in cuts. where are the cuts? they're in bills that you, mr. speaker, have voted for. >> so it all comes down to tax revenues and spending cuts. tom foreman gives us a virtual view of what is involved in negotiations. watch. >> what you're looking at in the room is everything the federal government spends money on. and that scoreboard back there shows you the problem. last year we spent $3.6 trillion in all of the stuff. but we only took in 2.3 trillion in taxes or revenue. democrats talk in the talks about the revenue side of the equation. they say if we can find a way to gin up more taxes lean on the rich harder, that's how we can dole with the deficit. republicans agreeing we need more revenue
slow walk the process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. herhere's what we do know. we know the president wants more stimulus spending and an increase in the debt limit without any cuts for reforms. that is not fixing our problem, frankly, it is making it worse. on top of that, the president wants to raise tax rates on many small-business owners. but even if we did exactly what the president wants, we would see red ink for as far as the eye can see. that is not fixing our problem either, just making it worse. i think the members know i am an optimist. i am hopeful we can reach an agreement. this is a serious issue and there's a lot at stake. the american people sent us here to work together. toward the best possible solution, and that means cutting spending. now if the president doesn't agree with our approach, he has an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the commerce. because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering when is the president going to get serious. >> to some that all up, house republicans hav
has a lot at stake if the fiscal cliff isn't averted. the state could lose $4.5 billion in federal funds. the legislative analyst office estimates the budget may shrink by $11 billion over two years. >> people think the economy would be drawn into recession. just like any recession that would affect state economy, revenues and result in billions of less tax revenue for the state.@sh >> southern california could be hit hard. a loss of 135,000 jobs last year. another recession is the last thing they want. they're urnling leaders to come to an agreement. >> if it continues to slow as much as it is now, it's fine, if at all. >> because voter as prove td prop 30,i sales tax will go up one quarter of a percent. high wage earners will are to pay more. if the bush tax cuts are loued to expire, a typical family of four liability will go up another $2200 a year. >> eating and rent and bills and stuff? it's hard. >> no deal on avoiding the fiscal cliff means about 400,000 are set to lose their unemployment benefits extension. thousands of low income families whose programs relie on funding c
involved in this debate over the fiscal cliff now? what steak did they have in this? >> we think we are one of the last remaining organizedd forces in the economy that fight to invest that revenue and get the people back to work. because the private sector by itself is not generating the millions of more jobs. so it's about jobs and making sure we do not cut vital services to the people desperately need them. it's not just about the services, but it's also about stabilizing the employment of people in the healthcare and social security sector. so we have got to get back to work and protect services. that's why we think it's incumbent on us to have this fight as well. >> thank you for your time thank you for your time. next any time a right to work battle props up the meddling koch brothers are sure to pop up. and from cory booker to ted cruz to hillary clinton it seems the most interesting head figures these days are drank the kool-aid. (vo) this friday current tv presents a special event. >> nobody knows disasters like comedians. that's why for my upcoming
. >> thanks so much. >>> last night he describes what he says is to use the debt creel as a pawn in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> they see the handwriting on the wall and they're going to have to extend it, and if they don't the whole country will see they were willing to tank the entire economy and give everybody the tax break to give people at the top a bonus. where they're just dead wrong, ed, is thinking they're going to gain leverage over this debt ceiling because the american people are not going to stand for republicans turning right around and threatening to destroy the american economy by having the united states default on its debts. >> don't miss "the ed show" 8:00 p.m. eastern time. >>> there are new details about the stunning military operation and the u.s. navy s.e.a.l. who heroically gave his life to help save a doctor kidnapped by the taliban. nbc's jim has the story. >>> he was a highly decorated navy veteran killed sunday in afghanistan. the s.e.a.l.s set out to rescue an american relief worker dr. dilip joseph kidnapped last week on the road east of kabul. joseph was hel
washington. this is where we've camped out all night. there's been all this talk about the fiscal cliff. we know it is fact approaching. we know it is something that would threaten not only the united states economy, but the economies around the globe. if we go over that cliff, there will be steep cuts and spending and steep tax increases that would automatically kick in. what we're doing here today is talking to our elected officials, talking to people who are involved in these talks, trying to figure out what will happen, where we are and if there's any way to avoid that cliff, if there's a good way to come about with tax reform and a close look at what's been happening on the spending side, as well. we have a lineup of a lot of gets who are here. joining us this morning, early on we'll be joined by representative jeb henserling. he will give us on some of the insight on what is happening. we're talking to senators this morning. senator ron johnson will be joining us. and grove er nordquist. he is rite in the center of this base. a lot of people see him as a huge part of the problem. if y
reconsider the controversial measure. >>> and president obama and house speaker boehner mum on fiscal cliff negotiations. and a sign that a deal could be near. >>> new world order, the economy growing at an enormous rate in china, and in a few years it will surpass the u.s. what it means, coming up. >>> dozens of homes damaged in the south, ripping off roofs and damaging trees. more to come. stamp watch, straight ahead. >>> lots to talk about this morning. the next two hours, we'll talk with steve israel. jeff sessions, sandy levin, rahm emanuel and businessman javier paolomarez, ed burns, frankie monday easy, and chuck leavell. "starting point" begins right now. welcome, everybody. "starting point" this morning, angry, united. bracing for protests in michigan as the state is poised to become the most unionized right to work state. as many as 10,000 unionized workers expected at the state capitol to voice their disapproval of the measure. some of them teachers, two detroit area school districts shut down for the day as hundreds of teachers plan to join the protest. president obama brought i
opposition to new revenues as the fiscal cliff clock ticks down. this is what he said earlier on "squawk box." listen up. >> raising tacks is always bad for the economy. that doesn't change. raising taxes is what politicians do instead of reforming government. the reason we haven't reformed entitlements, the reason we haven't reined in spending, politicians go we'll raise taxes and backfill. >> representative kevin yoder, a republican from kansas, sits on the house appropriations committee. a plum assignment especially for a freshman. he's one of a handful of republicans who did not sign the norquist taxpayer protection pledge. congressman yoder, welcome. why didn't you sign the pledge and are you happy you didn't? >> i didn't sign pledges. i don't believe our job is to make a pledge to a third party group. my pledge is to the third party district. as the debate wages on on how to get off the fiscal cliff. i'm not one to make a pledge to a third party group. how do we get through the situation, find the best result for american people. there's a lot of opinions out there. we have to listen t
in technology. >>> our fourth story, selling a fix. with just 22 days until the fiscal cliff kicks in and we all go sailing off. we're hearing a lot of talk about talking between the president and the house speaker. apparently, these talks are behind closed doors because they're talking over or at or something not good at each other. here is president obama today in detroit on his plan to raise taxes on families making more than $250,000 a year. >> that's a principle i won't compromise on because i'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks. >> is the tough talk road show working for the president tonight? ben labolt is a former press secretary for the obama campaign. he had a vacation that's why he looks healthy now. and republican strategist terry holt. good to see both of you. terry, i want to start with you. the most recent poll we have "the washington post"/pew says by a margin of about 2 to 1, americans say republicans in congress will be to blame if there's not a deal on the fiscal cliff. so is the speaker losing
an agreement that helps us avoid the so-called fiscal cliff and also achieves the broader deal which would address this longer term deficit challenge that we face in a way that helps the economy grow and create jobs. that's our focus at the moment. and we believe there is time. yeah. >> the clock is winding down on secretary clinton's time at the state department. she's expected to leave at the end of next month. and there's been a lot of speculation that a decision would have been made now on who would replace her. what is the holdup? >> there's no holdup. the president has made no decisions and i have no personnel anougesments to make -- announcements to make. >> about the decision to allow corporate donations for the inaugural festivities, why did the president change his mind on that? >> i would refer to you pick which has been set up and i think is taking questions on that. i haven't had that discussion. >> the president was part of the transition committee in 2008 and 2009, when they announced that the reason they were settinging new limitations was -- [inaudible] to put the country
of these solutions that the fiscal cliff presents, how am i going to word that? it's too much austerity and it is too much tax increases at least, for the budget, or the for the economy to manage. so my question is, that was very wordy, how much is too much, how much is too late to try to just stabilize the problem we're in? >> well, ashleigh, you described the problem, really, it's not just the immediate fiscal cliff, it's this big thing in my book, savage truth on money. i've had that book about how we really are coming to an impasse. and the only way out is economic growth. that's only way the individual family -- you know, if you have a budget problem, if you could only get a better-paying job. if someone else in your family could work, you'd solve your problems right away. the same thing for the united states economy. we need to grow. we won't grow until we have confidence. confidence for business to expand, for banks to lend, for consumers to go out and buy that new house, and we won't have that until we get congress to act. that's the critical nature of this. sure, there's a debt ceili coming
these myths, i hope that we have a more constructive discussion on averting this fiscal cliff. republicans have already stated they are willing to accept some new revenue. speaker boehner has put $800 billion in new revenues on the table. however, we still not have heard from any sub substantive ideas m the president or other leading democrats about cuts to spending or entitlements. we haven't even heard the president say good things about the simpson-bowles recommendations, a commission he appointed, a commission that had republicans and democrats on it, a commission that reported that had conservative republicans and liberal democrats saying we ought to do what we can to see the simpson-bowles approach through. it would be nice to see the president endorse a recommendation of a committee he appointed that had a suggestion for taking care of this fiscal cliff problem. if he had done that two years ago, we wouldn't be debating the fiscal cliff today. so there are serious concerns on my side of the aisle that any agreement we reach will result in immediate tax hikes but promise spending --
be done about the fiscal cliff talk. what surprised us off the record behind the scenes, democrats and republicans agree they should be doing a lot more than they're talking about as part of the current negotiations. they said if you did more on tax reform and particularly on the corporate side and more on social security as far as limiting the growth of that program, more on medicare, if you did something to exploit this oil and gas boom that we're seeing in north dakota, texas and across the country, if you did more to get high skilled immigrants into town, you could not only have an economic recovery but an economic boom. there's a lot of agreement off the record on this, but that politicians on both sides are scared to go out there and be the first to say, hey, let's do these big things that could have an appreciable effect on the economy. >> steve, do you agree with that assessment? what are the big things that need to be done? >> i totally agree. the thing that's depressing about the fiscal cliff plan, we will change the tax code, change this, a tax on gas to help the energy
in people's pockets, which helps the economy and the unemployment weekly payment is not enough to make anyone comfortable and lazy, but it does cost money. so, that is one of the many things in the fiscal cliff discussions that we also have to deal with. the social security payroll tax holiday that we have had for two years -- they have to decide whether to extend that by december 31, and there is also the issue of the alternative minimum tax, which is designed to make sure that everybody pays something in income tax, especially among the wealthy who might use deductions to bring their tax payments down to zero. the problem is the alternative minimum tax has been affecting more and more middle-class people, and the irs in particular is eager for congress to take a stand on patching up the minimum tax by december 31 because mostly they have to program their computers. host: the amt was part of our series on the different aspects of the fiscal cliff talks. you can go to our web site to find more details. today, the discussion is about domestic spending. if sequestration happens at the en
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